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here for decades. we need to protect their environment. we have a strict quarantine system to protect the integrity of the environment. forty years on, it's still a class-a nature reserve. it's our job to look after them. ...it's my job to look after it. ♪ >>> bobby smith's voice came right through loud and clear on many of the great songs by the spinners. he was a tenor. he could be heard on "could it be i'm falling in love" and "i'll be around" and "games people play." he earned the group almost a dozen gold records, half a dozen grammys. he was 76 years old. >>> new york mayor bloomberg is at it again as part of his health campaign. today he proposed stores that sell cigarettes, hide them from view just like dirty magazines. people of age can still ask for cigarettes and buy them at $10 a pack. the mayor just wants to make them less visible. he banned smoking in restaurants and sbarz -- bars during his first term, and he gave hundreds of millions of dollars to anti-smoking efforts. he's already gone after trans fats in restaurants, styrofoam containers, and now rather famously, h
energy here for decades. we need to protect their environment. we have a strict quarantine system to protect the integrity of the environment. forty years on, it's still a class-a nature reserve. it's our job to look after them. ...it's my job to look after it. ♪ is i can follow all my sports... catch the latest breaking news... keep in touch with friends... follow the financial headlines... find a great restaurant... and with siriusxm i can get weather forecasts... all from here. in my mercedes-benz. [ male announcer ] introducing mbrace2. the most comprehensive cloud-based telematics system on the road. it's your world, from your car. mercedes-benz. the best or nothing. a boost tonight for backers of same-sex marriage. former secretary of state hillary clinton has come out in support of the same sex unions. tonight kron 4's dan kerman looks at what clinton had to say. fan >> i support marriage and for lesbian and gay couples personally and a you matter of policy and law. >> she joined the ever- increasing politicians to come out and support. >> a few years ago bill and i celeb
point i would like to make is that the environment is really changing rapidly. 10 years ago, if we had sat down and talk about seniors and technology, a lot of people would have wondered why seniors would want to use computers, but that has shifted. over the next few years, as all of us move toward being seniors, we will not be wanting technology. we will be demanding it. the field is going to change, and more and more people are going to be here. so the ability to make technology accessible is there. those of us charged with doing this have a really important role. we have to be able to provide the tools for the technology in ways that the people can hear. i am happy to be your speaking with you because i think this is an incredibly important topic. this afternoon, there is a workshop on addressing multiple barriers for accessing technology, and it will be a brainstorming session where someone from my office and a couple of other people will be leading a discussion of what issues people run into and how you deal with them. i think it is a really important topic and i think it is proba
each and every one of god's creatures, and the environment in which we live, it means protecting people, taking care of everyone with love, especially the children, the elderly. those who are fragile and who are always left in the periphery of our hearts. it means taking care of one another within our families as wives take care of each other and then as parents they take care of their children, and then over time the children themselves will take care of their parents. it means living friendship with sincerity since they are a way of protecting each other in trust, respect and goodness. in the end everything has been entrusted to our protection as men. it is a responsibility that involves all of us. the protectors of god's gift. whenever human beings fail to live up to this responsibility, whenever we fail to take care of creation and our brothers and sisters then the ways open to destruction, destruction of hearts that are hardened and every period of history unfortunately there are parents who fought death and countenance of men and women. i would like to ask all of those who hold po
. ♪ chevron has been developing energy here for decades. we need to protect their environment. we have a strict quarantine system to protect the integrity of the environment. forty years on, it's still a class-a nature reserve. it's our job to look after them. ...it's my job to look after it. ♪ same with aladdin. the biggest in bail. no one has lower prices, is faster or more professional. aladdin bail bonds. bigger because we're better. ncaa - st. mary's vs middle tennessee st. randy bennett 2nd half mathew dellavadova deep 3- pointer 34-24 gaels steven holt of the turnover lays it in/ 45-38 st. mary's randy bennett shakes hands final: 67-54 st.mary's nit - stanford vs steven f. austin johnny dawkins back to defend nit title 2nd half dwight powell with the huge ally-oop dunk 51-44 stanford final seconds steven f. austin down by one with a chance to win but the 15-footer falls short cardinal win final: 58-57 stanford nuggets win 13th straight kevin durant and the thunder looking to snap the nuggets 12-game win streak 1st quartertr durant drives and hits the tough one-handed jumper 29
about in a network world. we're are in this environment and network participatory environment and our students need the tools. they need social emotional learning is a key tool and technical and literacy and media is behavioral so this has just been a fantastic day. thanks to all for coming and thank you everybody. i just want to share one piece of data which i don't understand completely. maybe our friend from facebook can explain, his twitter colleagues what they do. a hash tag was created and "stop bullying sf barb and hash tag and generated 3 million personal impressions and 1.3 million followers within the last 24 hours. [applause] isn't that incredible? we talked about some of the dangers in social media today and i guess that's part of the beauty of social media and the video is part of that as well, so on behalf of all the childrens and families and parents and communities in the district i want to thank everybody for coming for all the work that you do. i feel optimistic in all of work that you do. thank you and go forth and do great work. ♪ of life. in the name of g
need to protect their environment. we have a strict quarantine system to protect the integrity of the environment. forty years on, it's still a class-a nature reserve. it's our job to look after them. ...it's my job to look after it. ♪ >>> it is believed, though not confirmed, that mankind has sent an object outside our own solar system for the first time. voyager i was launched 35 years ago to explore the planets. it traveled 11 billion miles. now some astronomers say it and its companion, voyager ii are the two most distant active representatives of humanity and its desire to explore. put it this way. if all the cars made were as well made as the voyager there would be no need for a break-down lane. >>> speaking of space it always bothered jeff bazos that engines that powered apollo xi to the moon were disposable. they were meant to fall into the sea. even though the engines played a huge role in space history. well, jeff is the guy behind amazon.com. he's well financed and enjoys a good challenge. so today after a year of trying, they brought up engine parts from the deep.
has been developing energy here for decades. we need to protect their environment. we have a strict quarantine system to protect the integrity of the environment. forty years on, it's still a class-a nature reserve. it's our job to look after them. ...it's my job to look after it. ♪ >> tonight. we're learning the name of the police officer involved in the latest officer-involved shooting in san jose. he is bruce barthelemy - a 5-year veteran of the department. video from our helicopter partnership with abc 7 news shows the scene monday night. barthelemy fired one round, killing the still unidentified driver of a stolen car. police say the driver was trying to run the officer down. they also confirm that barthelemy was involved in another officer-involved shooting in november of last year. when he shot and wounded a suspect in a murder and robbery rampage. the santa clara county sheriff's office is handling the latest investigation. barthelemy is on administrative leave during an investigation by police internal affairs and by the d-a. been waiting for the price of mattresses to fa
of time to continue to reduce crime and continue to create a safe environment and environment where we would not necessarily need to have this large investment in the criminal justice system. [ applause ] >> to mr. gas skon. if we were to eliminate money bail in effect turn over a decision whether or not someone is in custody to a judge whether or not they have been violator likely to reoffending or a flight risk, do you think that kind of system would likewise get accused of discrimination against the poor or racial minorities or do you think it would be more fair? >> i think it would be more fair. if you look at the fact that hispanics for instance are under the current system 4 percent more likely to be held on a pretrial setting than whites, 27 percent, we can show there is a disparity there. if we create a model that is based on evidence base risk factors that can be applied to the individual and the setting of that individual and can be done objectively not because an officer is making a decision but putting some kind of value system to those factors that are likely to impact r
earnings cycle. also in this environment the u.s. economy is growing more like 2% and a lot less like 4 in that environment pricing is going to be challenged and the top line sales is not going to be universal for all firms. it will be balance sheet by balance sheet and case by case. security collection becomes far more important. >> i was going to say as you point out the profit growth picture has been pretty good but we are getting at the mature point in that cycle and the forecast is about 1% or 2% overall growth. there are always ways to make more money than the index tracking would lead you to believe. where do you think the pockets of possible better than average profits would be? >> so we do like equities. when you compare that to fixed income certainly in government space so we like equities and we like global equities. it will have to be a multi asset strategy which is kind of all of the above. looking at commodities and debt and equities and looking in companies in europe. there are good companies with strong balance sheets in europe, as well. looking into russia, indonesia, m
outcry the dtsc said our job as public servants is to protect people's health and their environment. but many are questioning how well the department can do that when its top deputy director is a chevron shareholder. >> when i first came to dtsc it was 1985. >> reporter: this is a department youtube video. >> sigh hai have been here a lo years. >> are we have obtained financial statements for dtsc leaders. the deputy director includes stock in abbott laboratories and bp. she had up to a million dollars in shares of general electry. all are companies that deal with toxic waste and are regulated by dtsc. >> one of our top managers had a invested interest in the companies that we oversee. >> reporter: lisa tucker authored this report accusing dtsc of allowing companies to operate without a permit. >> they know there is pollution that can harm people and do nothing about it. that is outrageous. >> a safe and stainable communities. >> reporter: stewart black's investments include shell, intel and proctor and gamble. more companies regulated by dtsc. neither responded to our request for c
street about 10 years ago. the environment is huge. it is stronger than willpower. surrounding yourself with artists, being in a culture where artists are driving, and where a huge amount of them is a healthy environment. >> you are making it safer. push, push. that is better. when i start thinking, i see it actually -- sometimes, i do not see it, but when i do, it is usually from the inside out. it is like watching something being spawned. you go in, and you begin to work, excavate, play with the dancers, and then things began to emerge. you may have a plan that this is what i want to create. here are the ideas i want to play with, but then, you go into the room, and there maybe some fertile ideas that are becoming manifest that are more interesting than the idea you had initially set out to plan. so there has to be this openness for spontaneity. also, a sense that regardless of the deadline, that you have tons of time so the you can keep your creativity alive and not cut it off and just go into old habits. it is a lot like listening. really listening to watch what is going to emerge.
, protecting the environment, talking about the poor and the weak. showing his humility, talking about authentic power being service. and also talking about the darkness and we heard this from him before when he's booked journalists as an audience. he spoke of call to right the wrongs. father, i think if in much the way a presidential inaugural address lays out the agenda for presidency, we have heard him laying out the agenda for the papacy. >> he's going to do it with authentic powers in service, to the people of god, do it with tenderness with a great sense of hope. the sense of hope. this is really very franciscan spiritu spirituality. it's a positive thing because god so loved us. if we never would have sinned, god would have come to us. this is what the pope is echoing here. you get an echo of john xxiii, the first pope of women of good will. it's not just for the church and himself, but men and women. put this in practice, to love tenderly and protect the vulnerable. >> so early in a papacy we look for symbolism and meaning in the words of a pope or in the little things he does.
we have a strict quarantine system to protect the integrity of the environment. forty years on, it's still a class-a nature reserve. it's our job to look after them. ...it's my job to look after it. ♪ >>> let me finish with a circular firing squad assembled in the republican party. the party began in the years heading up to the civil war. you had the whig party, the abolitionists. the whigs were the politics ready to make practical political decisions. in 1860, they all got together behind abraham lincoln. i wonder if they do it again in 2016 in the party's still split in two. the establishment types, they like holding office and are willing to bend a little to get power. the abolitionists are on principle. as for gay marriage, they'd just as soon there not be in gays, period. they're not about to let them have wedding rings and all other parts of straight life. the karl rove winning elections and the abolitionists wing are in for a prolonged situation. 2014 will be tough, but once these two gangs, the palin and rove crowds, have to meet again in 2016, it's not going to be pretty
environment for the fed reserve to stay stock market friendly. that's exactly what happened today. ben bernanke allowed the averages to power higher. dow gained 56 points. the s&p rising today, nasdaq jumping .78%. it's not sleight of hand or alchemy at work here, despite what critics say when they constantly slam the fed. >> boo! >> bernanke is not playing a game of move the stock market higher by simply continuing to keep the competition from bonds incredibly weak. he's got a real good reason for doing what he's doing, which is staying the course, keeping rates low. that reason? 1937. see, ben bernanke is a rigorous guy. he's a professor and a genuine scholar of american financial history. it's what he does best. he knows that in 1937 after three years of 12% economic growth that took unemployment from 25% down to 14%, the fed, the president, congress, declared victory over the great depression. ♪ hallelujah >> washington raised income taxes on the wealthy. >> boo! >> took the top marginal rate to the astounding 75% and instituted a 2% payroll tax for social security. their goal? t
and their way of exploring their environment which is to use their mouth which, unfortunately, is full of really sharp teeth and mounted on top of several hundred pounds of powerful fish. they bite on to things to find out what they are, and in this case it's possible there really was no malice intended here, that the animal was simply exploring the environment and probably gave a bit of a fright, too, when if managed to get stuck in the cage. >> so the great white shark, one of the most dangerous species in the world, i guess if you're in its environment, why would anyone want to get this close to it? >> it's a thrill-seeking activity, no doubt about that. what a magnificent animal but it is true that this species is responsible for more attacks on humans, more fatal attacks on humans more than any other shark species and you've got a much better chance of being struck by lightning than being attacked by a shark in an unprovoked fashion. in this situation you have to wonder how unprovoked that situation was when you're using bait to attract animal to you in the first place. that create an unnat
the important things, they are all from pretty average environments. extremely different in terms of structure. does this go towards mitigation? how should it be used? how should this information be used to? i use it to dole out treatment. that is how i thought we would kick start this seminar. i am happy to answer any other questions. i did not do this all by myself. i had a lot of individuals who helped me with this data. this research is all funded by the national research of health, your tax dollars. thank you for your attention. i will turn over to our moderator. thank you. [applause] >> actually, i would like to, i'm going to ask a few questions, but i was hoping we could get a debate going here rather than with me trying to ask intelligent questions and just have the very smart people just talking amongst themselves to educate us. so one of the questions that we're wanting to talk about today was the idea of free will in terms of the criminal justice system. and i would like to ask each of you, is there a definition of free will in the context of your individual work? we'll start with y
will make the environment better. we had approximately 1,000 overflows occur in 1999. today, we've reduced overflows by 45% to 50%. and it's going to continue to improve as we go forward with the rehabilitation program that's required under the consent decree. narrator: an important piece of the program is the construction of an 8-mile-long storage tank that will significantly decrease combined sewer overflows. man: right now, we're at the bottom of the rockdale construction shaft. we're 310 feet below grade, deep under atlanta in hard rock. in the downtown area of atlanta, the sewer system and the stormwater system are combined and there are overflows during storm events, and so the purpose of this system is to relieve that flow, take it into the tunnel, transport it to a brand-new treatment plant, clean up the chattahoochee river. narrator: instead of the combined sewage overflowing into the river, it will flow into this tunnel that acts as a storage tank. the water will then slowly empty into the new plant for treatment before it's released back into the river. man: the system in total
environment is a relatively new concept. there are a few buildings in other major cities where they have installed wind turbines on the roof. and wind turbines in buildings are effective. >> the discussion was do we do that or not? and the answer was, of course. if they're not perfect yet, they're building a building that will last 100 years. in 100 years someone is going to perfect wind efficient turbines. if these aren't right, we'll replace them. we have time to do that. >> the building that's two renewable energy generations. wind turbines located on the north facade. two different levels of photo volume takes. >> we have over 600 solar panels and three platforms on the building, and four integrated wind turbines. the wind turbines and the solar panels produce 7% of the building's energy. and we're reducing the use of energy here by 32% in the office building. >> the entire building is controlled by a complex computer system which monitors and adjusts air, heating and lights as well as indoor shades. >> the building is going to be a smart building. it's going to have all integrated f
that a man and woman would provide a better environment than two mothers or two fathers. >> i'm not saying it should be illegal for that, but we should not change the definition of marriage in such a way that we enshrine in the law that a child does not deserve a mother or father. >> they announced their support for same-sex marriage saying that there is no evidence that sexual orientation of the parents has an impact on the child. rebecca is executive director of san francisco's center. >> they say significant charges in school and prejudice from the world having two same-sex parents, they turn out equally happy and equally successful in school and in life. >> reporter: the archbishop disdis agrees if the high court does legalize it his fear it will end the institution of marriage. >> what i feel would happen is that people just not be interested in marrying anymore. marriage will become irrelevant. >> he added the church will suffer. >> what we are teaching is bigotry and discrimination, we're not going to be allowed to do that. >> the archbishop believes that if church teachings are bel
and i think what you are probably saying is, you know, maybe we should consider very severe environments in case of a disaster which personally i think that's how we train and probably most of your environments. maybe you want to start from a place of more limitations rather than less and one of them is not doing that kind of coordination via cell phone. again, i think this was, last year there was a table top, this is the first time we're actually doing a drill. there's reason for growth and as bijon said, maybe next year we are meshing xhapld and control so command and control is done over the exercise com link and keeping it separate. i think the point is well taken that the recommendation i made, i think we can introduce more rigor into the execution of the com drills next year. >> any other questions? panelists, thank you very much, i appreciate it. let's give them a big round of applause. (applause). >> something that took place yesterday was our medical exchange. rob is going to give you a summary of how that went and at the same time we're going to bring up some additional pane
the reaction was within the leadership of israel and i think they felt we finally have an environment in which we can talk constructively. >> talking about a two-state solution, there's some talk over there about a one-state solution. read the economist. one-state solution is a bad idea, correct? >> yes, i think it's a bad idea. >> should be two states. >> israel is never going to go for a one-state solution because they would soon be outnumbered by the palestinians. >> they will be outnumbered by the palestinians regardless of whether it's one state or not. >> they will not. >> eventually you would have a birks-national state. >> talking about -- >> well, the palestinians have the higher rate of population growth. >> correct. >> the theory is at some point they will overtake. >> 30 years. >> no, it's very close. >> there are five and a half pu barry and b b bromance. from the moment the president arrived at the airport in tel aviv there were smiles and jokes all around shared between president obama and israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu. the two leaders held a press conference outside
be really challenging in an environment like san francisco. so, i think every city is different. san francisco would be drastically affected if we adopted something that stringent. >> i just wanted to speak to -- a little bit to [speaker not understood] speaking about the vancouver program. and i do have some experience with that. ways also a coordinator of murals. and one of the benefits of having a process, whether that's a permit, whether there's a fee attached to that, whether there's a committee or if it simply goes through a process where different departments of the city can have input. for example, in vancouver and really the vancouver graffiti management mural program is almost identical to what tyra is talking about doing here. it's similar to public art murals, but similar in scope. when we were doing our murals, almost 200 of them, there was no permit in place, but there was a selection process. and, so, if that was the heritage property, that had to go to heritage. and they had to decide whether or not that building had been painted and if a mural would go there. if so,
-on/risk-off environment that we have to be cautious. yes, there's room to grows and investors have totally forgotten about europe since last summer. don't be surprised if it comes back later on this year. and quite heavily. >> how does it come back, though? is it the banking sector? specifically, let's talk about actual impacts to the u.s. market. >> well, the impact has a lot to do with the concern of where we're going, the kind of money we're spending and the kind of debt we have. you know, we're not too far behind europe. and obviously, we're a long way away from greece, but when you look at germany and france and some other companies, it's still a very dangerous environment. they still have a very low to negative growth rate. we're still looking at positive. you know, we had some good response from the housing market earlier today, but we still need to be very, very cautious. yes, there's room to grow. prices of stocks are not overvalued by no means. but we still need to be very cautious of where we're going in terms of debt and the economy. >> all right. so we're vulnerable in that regard. let's talk
. if you're in creation, environment, ecology will not be lost on this pope. there are other issues in which he can emphasize main line catholic teachings. >> father beck, if you could weigh in on that as well. >> all of those issues you mentioned, women priest, certainly, would be the most unchanged. birth control, 1969, the end result of that was not to listen to a group that was at vatican recommending a change in the church position on that. this pope could have another conversation about birth control if he wanted to. married priesthood. that is a discipline in the catholic church. it's not doctrine. for the first 1,000 years of the church priests married. we have now anglo can priests coming from the anglo can communion into the roman catholic communion. it's being done. there's no reason it can't be done. that is the highest moral barometer, one's countries conscious. >> you said he could but will he based on what we know about him? >> well, again, he has been considered rather conservative with most of these issues thus far. he's already surprised us and broke general tradit
with the government and a very war hawkish administration seemed to be anti-american. so in that environment, the voices that were speaking out against this war, but in that environment, those voices could be muffled and people were being painted as being anti-american because they were pro peace. >> right. mrs. walsh, we saw what donald rumsfeld said on twitter. we saw dick cheney say he would do it all over again and not acknowledge any mistakes. >> the main fault -- i don't spend a lot of time thinking about my faults i guess would be the answer. >> no kind of political introspection there. but will history let these men off the hook for what they did? >> no, they're going down in history for a horrible, terrible war. i was going to say a lapse of judgment, but it was not a lapse of judgment. it was a deliberate act. they cooked the evidence. they browbeat people. they would karl rove as their political hench men. the vote was scheduled on the eve of the elections deliberately. i don't want to let democrats off the hook. 29 senate democrats voted to authorize the use of force. some apolog
, the economic, political and social environment, all men and woman of goodwill, we are all protectors of creation. >> reporter: he spent an hour and a half greeting dignitaries and then retreat treated to the vatican and took to the most modern mode of communication to address the rest of us. he tweeted. true power is service. the pope must serve all people, especially the poor, the weak, the vulnerable. what a celebration. >>> still to come, washington state picked a pot czar. the weed warden comes out front because where else would you go as the weed warden? >>> explosives and other weapons next to a body in the dorm room and that video of that discovery, we have it for you and the verdict in the case of a woman charged with murdering her own grandson. >> 911, what's your emergency? >> i've just been shot. >> what? >> i've just been shot. >> where are you at? okay. how did you get shot? who shot you? >> my grandmother shot me. >> your grandmother and grandpa shot you? >> my grandma. i'm going to die. [ female announcer ] what if the next big thing, isn't a thing at all? it's lots of
have suffered. it's a low-interest environment, which makes stocks the only liquid investment game in town and that explains the market we're in. joining me is the the chief economist at rbs securities and ned riley, the ceo. i have laid out why the fed has fuld the rally. when you buy a stock, you're buying a share of its earnings. the price to earnings ratio used to figure out the value of a stock is still low. let's take a look here. i want to show our viewers. the s&p 500 is seeing average earnings of 15. that's the bottom bar. that's half of where they were. lower than where they were five years ago when the dow was trading at about where they are now. that makes me think this isn't just the federal reserve. what do you think? >> it isn't. as a matter of fact, the fear that's in people's hearts right at the moment, it reminds me of rodney dangerfield. the market has no respect. nobody has respect for this market that it is real. clearly we're seeing the public and institutions, i might point out, have been lowering their equity exposure. the the public only has 30% in ek equit
boring monetary policy environment. nothing has happened. a lot of detailed nuances, minor changes in wording in the fed statement. actually, that's what we ought to want. monetary policy ought to be as boring as the electricity supply. when you turn the light switch on you want allied-signal one. you don't need to know anything more. that's where we are right now. but there is an issue lurking in the background that needs to be discussed. it is not being discussed in the market or in the fed. cheryl: what is it? >> that issue, that issue has to do with congress -- granting that fed the party in 2008 to pay interest on bank reserves. and that interest is now only about 5 billion per year at 25 basis points. but at an interest rate of 1 percent where the fed is going to be going in some places along the way that would be four times as much. assuming that reserves are in the neighborhood of 2 trillion which is where they are no. as the fed goes of, go to 2% that doubles once again. think about the fiscal clef the legislation that was accomplished at the very end of last year, signed
to what's happening in our immediately environment and what we can see around us and what literally touches us physically. if you're walking through the woods and you hear the crack of a stick behind you, your body immediately goes into a fear response, a fight or flight response. climate change isn't that kind of a problem. it's not an immediate, visceral threat. and i can say right now, this very day, we can look out the window and there's co2, carbon dioxide, pouring out of tailpipes, pouring out of buildings, pouring out of smokestacks. and yet we can't see it, it's invisible. the fundamental causes of this global problem are invisible to us. and likewise the impacts are largely invisible to us as well unless you know where to look. so it's a problem that first of all we can't see. and secondly it's a problem that is seemingly faceless. it's not like terrorists who we can imagine who are coming after us trying to kill us and challenge our fundamental values. it's a problem that we can't see, that's going to have long term impacts that aren't going to just impact us now, but impa
through their dress and environments. like many photographs taken today 17th century portraits were taken from weddings. from 1625 him and his wife are exceptional examples of large scale marriage portraits. other typical occasions for commissioning portraits were births. capture the innocence of a beloved child. one of rembrandt's pupil. we see why he became a painter. the child's face reveal his own mature vocabulary. for those who have seen the exhibition it's exhibited next to rembrandt's work and you can see the two side by side. from this period, who was most famous for his self portraits. at the time, the paintings, is a copy of the original tradition of rembrandt. here you see the two paintings together which makes a subtle variations evident. the angle of the head and more controlled and refined manner of the brush work and copy on the left suggest that these paintings are probably not by the same hand. we now have scientific evidence which further suggest that the morris picture is a studio copy perhaps by the talented artist gart who is rembrandt's first people. you may remem
that was set and the environment was set up by the teachers. and so, in a sense, there was thoughtful planning put into what's going to be happening in the classroom, but at the same time, there's an openness about what the kids are interested in, what they're doing, that will allow you to focus in on their interests. at this point in time, i thought this was an interesting idea. so i started asking them some questions about what's going on, what they're doing, so as to get a sense of what they're thinking about initially so that we could talk about what the other teachers in the classroom-- where to go from this point. child: i'm seeing all of the colors. you're seeing all of the colors in the ocean. see that? i see there. where? show me again. where? i see green and red. you see green and red? me, too. do you see brown? no. hendrick: of course, no matter which techniques you decide to use, inevitably you will encounter some parents or family members who think you aren't doing enough fast enough, who want to accelerate the pace of their child's cognitive learning. woman: oh, let's see. let's
their environment. we have a strict quarantine system to protect the integrity of the environment. forty years on, it's still a class-a nature reserve. it's our job to look after them. ...it's my job to look after it. ♪ >> rnc chairman reince priebus. he joins us, nice to see you, sir. >> thank you, greta. >> greta: i should say happy birthday. >> it's nice to celebrate my birthday with you tonight and i had fun with my kids and wai wife sally. >> greta: this report was not prepared by you, right? >> it was five co-chairs that traveled around the country and we talked to -- and i participate in all the listening sessions around the country. we talked to over 50,000 people about the election, things they perceived went well. what the other side went well and things we didn't do that people wished we did. it was a full-blown analysis from everything to mechanics to campaign finance laws. >> greta: one of the questions, the perception according to you, is that the republican party-- >> according to polling. >> greta: a party of rich-- yeah, polling. party of rich, narrow, stuffy, out of touch peo
not communicate with the officers. they are in a precarious situation. they worked at a much closer environment and they cannot be perceived as a snitch. or that they are working with the police department. they are there to, down, emotionally, the anchor. what they do then, we have a shooting war homicide. and they go to the hospital to be with the families. any talk of retaliation -- they will work with our social workers at the hospital. and whether the retaliation must go next. to saturate and prevent and interrupt any violence that may occur. this is a component or peace that has been building. i polled the captains of payview, mission, ingleside and the northern district. these are the most affected by gang violence. they said they appreciated what the crn did what they want to see them more. they need to fill that communication. it also comes down to training and trust, to be able to have them talk to officers. they would address the officers, they had arrested some of them, when there were actually under. they will help the police and the community. under his guidance we are the most ac
of the environment, the protector of creation. brother, sun, sister, moon. he has just been ringing in the changes. >> maria, you have been observing the differents, and i know u you were watching closely, what struck you? >> i think he was so inspirational. i think by choosing the name francis, it's a very famous name, but he talks a lot about forgiveness, saying that people need to ask for more forgiveness. he talks about authenticity, and today he also spoke about what is true authentic power in service. i think these are the words and the messages that people around the world are longing for. >> and we're watching, we want to mention you're back with us on the "today show" in just a short while, and you're going to look at what women can offer. >> much more head coming up on the special edition of "the today show" coming up. >>> officials say a student's planned attack on the university of central florida was averted. a rapid response by campus authorities prevented the man from carrying out his plan for a campus assault. police were tipped off by a student who called 911 saying the suspect pu
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